Weekly_allowance_of_rationed_foods_for_one_adult_in_1941_ref_2435d_s_sFor Goodness sake, I was at the supermarket the other day when I saw a ‘ Love Upcycling’ magazine, which among other things claims that its helping people be thrifty! Included were such revolutionary ideas as painting old furniture, making cards etc, interspersed with ads for the expensive things you have to buy in order to do these ‘thrifty’ projects. Anyone of a certain age in the UK remembers when you never threw anything away, and I do wish we could go back to that. Why on earth anyone would want to spend a small fortune being ‘thrifty’ I have no idea. Clearly the ‘men in suits’ have cottoned on that its trendy to recycle so produced this so they can make money from the more gullible members of the public. But we know you can surf the net and gets ideas for free, dont we? To get some idea of the TRUE meaning of thrift, here is a recipe for a World War 2 dish, from a UK book called ‘More Kitchen Front Recipes’. dated 1941, when things were hard indeed.Here is a pic of the weekly food ration allowed per adult. Ironically people were healthier after the War than before it as you had to pump up your diet with home grown fruit and veg. What must have been hard was coal rationing – 1947 was the coldest winter on record! Sausages were known as ‘the sweet mysteries of life’ because  they contained so little meat!

Sausage rolls, Imitation

‘Sometimes we may long for sausage rolls but cannot get sausages ! This happened to me once, and this is what, on the spur of the moment, I did. There were some cold Haricot beans in the larder and about half a teacupful of cold meat lean and fat together ( there was about a breakfast cupful of the beans, and we were going to use them as a salad with an ordinary oil and vinegar dressing and a good chop of  fresh parsley). It didnt seem a very promising selection, but I found a small rasher of bacon from which the lean had been snipped off by the machine, so that only the fat was left, and this, with the meat and beans, were put through the mincing machine. I added a little more salt, and plenty of freshly ground pepper, and as the flavour was supposed to be sausage, a good chopping of sage. The mixture was then well pounded with a wooden spoon against the sides of the bowl until it did begin to look like sausage meat…and, to cut a long story short, we made our sausage rolls out of it, and very good they were.’

I havent tried it!

I rest my case!

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